A plastic-free town? Sewing group’s got it in the bag!

PUBLISHED: 08:21 05 June 2018 | UPDATED: 08:37 05 June 2018

Members of the community with some of the boomerang bags they have made to try and reduce plastic in Ottery.

Members of the community with some of the boomerang bags they have made to try and reduce plastic in Ottery.

Archant

A community group has been busy as bees creating fabric bags as part of its campaign to reduce single-use plastic in the town.

Hanna West helped to spearhead the Ottery Plastic Free community group and is on its steering group. The group launched its first sewing bee meeting this week in the Curious Otter to make fabric boomerang bags to try and reduce the town's use of plastic.Hanna West helped to spearhead the Ottery Plastic Free community group and is on its steering group. The group launched its first sewing bee meeting this week in the Curious Otter to make fabric boomerang bags to try and reduce the town's use of plastic.

Plastic Free Ottery launched earlier this year to reduce the consumption of environmentally-harmful plastics and promote positive recycling.

The group has been formed under a Surfers Against Sewage initiative and is working to complete a five-stage plan to make the town a plastic-free community.

This week, Hanna West, a member of the steering group, launched the group’s first sewing bee, which brings people together to create fabric-based bags called ‘boomerang bags’ – which will be on offer in shops for people to use when they forget their own.

Among the collection are tote, produce and bread bags, which will be available to buy in sets for people to have at home and in their car.

The bags will be available at tomorrow’s Ottery Food and Families Festival for a small donation.

Hanna said: “People can then return the bags when they’re finished or keep on using them.

“They are available in Otter Produce at the moment, but we hope to spread their availability as the initiative grows so we can replace as many plastic bags as possible.

“As a community we are going to have to change. We cannot wait for the big-wigs to do something. We can make a difference.”

The mum-of-one hopes to hold sewing bees every month or six weeks and looking for donations of fabric and thread, which can be dropped off at RIO.

The campaign has also been backed by businesses and local groups in the town, including the scouts, who gave a speech to the town council to get their backing.

Rosanna Dickason, Archie Cole and Amelia Serino, from the Escot Scout Troop, attended a recent meeting to talk about the impact of plastic, rubbish and pollution.

They said: “Plastic is used for everything. Our biggest concern is how people get rid of it. As you can clearly gauge, plastics are becoming an increasingly dangerous threat to wildlife, ourselves and future generations. To stop the destruction of the planet there needs to be change, and here is how.”

The rest of the troop have shown their support by going on litter picks as part of their environmental conservation badge.

For more information, email plasticfreeottery@gmail.com


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