Beer fear fishing crackdown

PUBLISHED: 11:30 29 January 2009 | UPDATED: 12:23 17 June 2010

A FISHING crackdown that could decimate Beer s recreational angling industry is being fought tooth and nail in the European Parliament. The European Commission is worried about the impact of recreational anglers - in some member states the industry is m

A FISHING crackdown that could decimate Beer's recreational angling industry is being fought 'tooth and nail' in the European Parliament.

The European Commission is worried about the impact of recreational anglers - in some member states the industry is making a huge dent in fish stocks.

So the commission has come up with new proposals to protect endangered species like Sole, and anglers would, for the first time, be included in the Common Fisheries Policy

Currently people who fish for pleasure are free to take home whatever they catch - but now the European Union wants to bring anglers into the quota system.

The new regulation would require recreational fishermen to register their boats, and whatever they catch would be counted against the fisheries quota for that country.

Each country will also be required to allocate what share of its quota for each fish species will be available for commercial and recreational fisheries use.

But the South West's Euro MP Neil Parish says Conservative MEPs will fight the move 'tooth and nail':

"Recreational fishing is a simple pleasure that would become a bureaucratic nightmare if these plans become law.

"This kind of draconian approach would do very little to assist in the recovery of fish stocks, yet it will cause a great deal of damage to tourism and the whole fishing sport."

Beer fisherman Cyril Newton said: "I think it is rubbish and will cause a lot more paperwork for nothing.

"I don't see how the police or anyone can enforce it and I don't see the point of it. There are no endangered species around here.

"Normally all my anglers chuck most of the fish back into the sea anyway. If they make it hard for anglers that puts me out of business."

The proposal is expected to begin its passage through the European Parliament later this month, with a final vote expected in April.


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