PICTURES: Sidmouth wildlife photographer shares snaps

PUBLISHED: 12:02 01 May 2020 | UPDATED: 12:02 01 May 2020

Sidmouth Wildlife. Picture: Mark Taylor Hutchinson

Sidmouth Wildlife. Picture: Mark Taylor Hutchinson

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A Sidmouth photographer who has got up close and personal with the world’s largest sharks is now making the most of the lockdown, snapping images closer to home.

Sidmouth Wildlife. Picture: Mark Taylor Hutchinson

Sidmouth Wildlife. Picture: Mark Taylor Hutchinson

Mark Taylor Hutchinson has now shared his brilliant snaps of the local wildlife and spoke about how it has piqued his interest. “I was planning my next shark diving assignment and had already planned to travel to another part of the UK to photograph some rare and timid mammals.

“Of course the world suddenly changed. Instead I focused my attention on the local Sidmouth wildlife in the lockdown age.

“I have done a number of local walks so now spent my time looking for ideal spots where specific species are likely to hang out.

“I do have a hide, but I decided to go freestyle on the move, apart from a bit of camouflage clothing and scrim netting.

Sidmouth Wildlife. Picture: Mark Taylor Hutchinson

Sidmouth Wildlife. Picture: Mark Taylor Hutchinson

“In all I have visited Mutters Moor, Salcombe Hill and a few other local spots all within walking distance from my home, although you have to like hills.

“I found a badger sett, noted a fox tended to follow the same route each day, give or take a few hundred feet, and I also found a buzzard nest.

“The rest of my encounters were a bit random, but if you stay in one spot long enough and blend in, you’d be surprised at how wildlife comings and goings soon resume.

“What’s more, if you just stop and be, you can also become transfixed with watching animal behaviour.

Sidmouth Wildlife. Picture: Mark Taylor Hutchinson

Sidmouth Wildlife. Picture: Mark Taylor Hutchinson

“When I happened upon a male roe deer, we both just stared at one another and I reeled off a couple of shots and slowly backed away and the deer just carried on eating.

“I saw a kestrel hovering on Peak Hill. The only animal I have never had any luck finding is an adder.

“But we are blessed to live in an area with abundant places to see wildlife and if nothing else, recent events have forced me to appreciate the wonderful wildlife on my very own doorstep, which is just as interesting and spectacular as further afield.”


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