Sidmouth artist is living piece of art in London!

A SIDMOUTH artist spent an hour on the ultimate soap-box in Trafalgar Square last Tuesday, becoming part of a human piece of mastery from the brains behind the Angel of the North.

A SIDMOUTH artist spent an hour on the ultimate soap-box in Trafalgar Square last Tuesday, becoming part of a human piece of mastery from the brains behind the Angel of the North.

Diane Hughes, of Sid Park Road, braved torrential rain to spend 60 minutes on the empty fourth plinth at the London landmark, usually reserved for statues of Kings and Generals, as part of an artwork called One and Other, by Anthony Gormley.

"As soon as I heard about the project I applied immediately, as an artist I relished the idea of being one of his living sculptures. When the phone call came to say I had a place I was very excited, however, it was a cancellation slot which only gave me 13 days to prepare," said Diane, who in turn used her hour to showcase a piece of her own work on an emotive subject.

"My artwork concerns memory and commemoration, the Royal British Legion have three of my large paintings in their Devon headquarters, and I planned to do a work of remembrance for the British servicemen and women who have died on active service in Iraq and Afghanistan," she said.


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"My work, Under Nelson's Gaze, remembers those who are not here, denied the chance to participate, and mark Britain's loss. I thought that the location of the Fourth Plinth at the very centre of our capital city, under Nelson's gaze, was the appropriate place for this."

Diane's piece consisted of a framed mesh from which she hung individual pieces red cloth as an act of remembrance.

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"I did have concerns that I might run out of time before attaching the 393 patches, but in the event I finished with just two minutes to spare before taking the work down," she said.

"I was so busy concentrating on top of the Plinth, I was not too bothered by the weather, although I was shocked when I replayed my time up there on the web, just how appalling it had actually had been."

Diane said her husband, Norman, had noticed one intent viewer who thanked him "profusely" and seemed "emotionally affected" by her display.

"He opened his jacket to reveal 7th Battalion, The Rifles, on his sweater," said Diane, adding: "I wish I had seen this young serviceman, I wish I had had the chance to talk to him.

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