Sidmouth charity bus given catalytic converter

PUBLISHED: 11:39 04 April 2011

Duncan Richards, sales director of European Exhaust and Catalyst, gives a free catalytic convertor to Sidmouth Living With Cancer's mini-bus after it was targeted by thieves

Duncan Richards, sales director of European Exhaust and Catalyst, gives a free catalytic convertor to Sidmouth Living With Cancer's mini-bus after it was targeted by thieves

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European Exhaust and Catalyst gives new catalyic converter for Sidmouth Living With Cancer’s mini-bus

THE largest manufacturer of catalytic converters in the UK has come to the aid of Sidmouth Living With Cancer.

The support group’s new mini-bus was off the road after thieves targeted it and three other vans, including Sidmouth Voluntary Services’ ambulance, stealing their catalytic converters.

When Steve Cross, marketing man for European Exhaust and Catalyst, based in Denmead, Hampshire, saw our story during a Westpoint Arena trade show this week, he contacted the Sidmouth Herald to offer SLWC a free new convertor.

He gave the good news to Alan Matthews, who is in charge of the bus drivers, and said: “We will be making it specially to fit the bus.”

Duncan Richards, sales director of EEC (pictured) said: “It’s terrible to hear that a cancer charity that relies on their transport has been targeted by thieves.

“As the cost of motoring continues to rise and funding is being reduced for crucial projects like these, organisations will struggle to find the money to replace stolen parts.

“As the only UK after-market manufacturer of the catalytic converter that fits the Living with Cancer minibus, we wanted to help the volunteers at the charity get back to doing their vital work in the community as quickly as possible.

“The theft of catalytic converters is significantly rising, due to the value of the precious metals inside the units, such as platinum, palladium and rhodium.”

EEC should have the convertor delivered this week.

With long delays over getting a new converter, because of the high number of thefts, a second-hand one had been bought for the bus following several donations after the Herald broke the news of the theft.

SLWC’s Bill Lankester said: “Everybody has been so kind and Sidmouth is a very special place to live in. We are so pleased that the mini-bus is back on the road and we can resume our outings.”


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