Sidmouth family ‘delighted’ with CRY screenings for young people

Marion Hayman at the free CRY screenings in memory of her son Jonathan. Ref shs 23-17TI 3810. Pictur

Marion Hayman at the free CRY screenings in memory of her son Jonathan. Ref shs 23-17TI 3810. Picture: Terry Ife - Credit: Archant

A Sidmouth couple who’s son died at the age of 27 have funded 100 appointments for young people in the town to undergo heart screenings by nation charity CRY.

Alex Hayman being tested at the free CRY screenings with cardiac physiologist Rob Pring. Ref shs 23-

Alex Hayman being tested at the free CRY screenings with cardiac physiologist Rob Pring. Ref shs 23-17TI 3812. Picture: Terry Ife - Credit: Archant

Young people have received access to potentially life-saving screenings funded in memory of a Sidmouth man.

Marion and Robert Hayman and their family secured appointments through the charity Cardiac Risk in the Young (CRY) after their son Jon, 27, died from Sudden Adult Death Syndrome in 2013.

The charity held its first clinic on Saturday at Sidmouth College, which was attended by more than 100 young people aged from 14 to 35.

Mrs Hayman said she was ‘delighted’ to have secured the screenings through the Jonathan Hayman Memorial Fund and hopes to make the event an annual one.


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She added: “I have been trying to raise awareness of the charity and the importance of young people getting a heart check. Four years ago I set up the Jon Hayman Memorial Fund through CRY for the sole purpose of being able to offer screenings for our local youngsters. Since then, I have been fundraising, along with friends and family, to make this possible.

“Saturday brought these efforts to fruition. The screening was free and funded by the memorial fund. It was wonderful to see so many of our local young people take advantage of this rare opportunity.

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“I will be continuing to fundraise and I would love to be able to make the screening an annual event. Thank-you to all in the local community who have helped make this event possible.”

CRY tests more than 23,000 young people a year for undiagnosed heart conditions and says the easy electrocardiogram could save the lives of 12 apparently healthy young people a week.

Dr Steven Cox, chief executive of CRY, said: “It takes great courage and determination for anyone who has been affected by young sudden cardiac death to be able to see beyond their own situation and to want to raise funds for CRY.

“Despite their own experience, I find it humbling that bereaved families are able to support us - often driven by the will to prevent other parents, siblings, partners and friends from having to endure the same devastating grief as they have.”

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