Sidmouth family’s carer deportation threat heartache

PUBLISHED: 16:55 14 December 2010

Robert Crick with Vivien Crick and her 96yr old father Victor. Victor's carer is being deported and so the family are very worried. Picture by Alex Walton. Ref shs 7802-49-10AW

Robert Crick with Vivien Crick and her 96yr old father Victor. Victor's carer is being deported and so the family are very worried. Picture by Alex Walton. Ref shs 7802-49-10AW

Archant

A CARER devoted to helping a 96-year-old Sidmouth dementia sufferer and his family faces being deported in a Government shake-up on immigration.

A CARER devoted to helping a 96-year-old Sidmouth dementia sufferer and his family faces being deported in a Government shake-up on immigration.

Victor Uren’s daughter and son-in-law fear they could have no choice but to put him in a home if the “wonderful” worker from the Philippines is forced to leave the country. Vivien and Robert Crick, of Glenisla Terrace, say Victor’s “independent” lifestyle in his own home, where the couple, friends and professionals provide him with round-the-clock care and support, will be jeopardised by what they have labelled a “xenophobic” policy.

A Coalition Government immigration cap will see the part-time Filipino carer, who wants to remain anonymous, among thousands of non EU workers in the industry deported from Britain.

“Her visa can’t be given by us,” said Victor’s son-in-law Robert.

“To say we’ve found somebody who is wonderful and will help our family manage its situation doesn’t work for the Home Office I’m afraid.”

“We’ve got a very good package altogether. It’s just that if this one carer, a live-in house keeper, is pulled out at this stage in Victor’s development we don’t think we can carry on with what suits him best.”

Victor’s daughter Vivien added: “Nobody will love him like I do. And so putting that responsibility onto another person is huge. She (the carer) does a wonderful job. I know he wouldn’t be cared for in his own home if I didn’t have her help.

“Certainly in towns like this, which have care homes that employ these extraordinary people working incredibly long, hard hours- who we’re now apparently going to restrict-, who’s going to look after these old people?”

The Filipino carer was set to land the qualification that would have given her a work permit, but instead received bad news as it was being processed.

“They wrote saying because the new Government wanted British jobs for British workers they were cutting the number of care workers from outside the EU,” said Robert. “I don’t actually agree with importing cheap foreign labour- not because of British jobs but because it is demeaning and exploitative.

“I think we should have the best people to do the job and pay them a living wage to do it.”

The family’s story featured on BBC Radio 4 consumer affairs programme You and Yours last week.


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