Sidmouth residents back flower ‘chips’

PUBLISHED: 14:44 14 July 2011

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The Herald revealed last week how East Devon District Council has utilised the tiny technology to nip thefts of floral delights in the bud.

RESIDENTS and visitors to Sidmouth have backed a hi-tech bid to halt green-fingered villains- by micro-chipping plants.

The Herald revealed how East Devon District Council has utilised the tiny technology to nip thefts of floral delights in the bud.

However, some doubt whether the ploy will prove a success and think it’s a waste of time and money, write Rebecca Thorne, Naomi Clarke and Rufus Baker-Morris.

“I think it’s a bit of a mad idea to be honest, it’s a shame that it’s come to this and they have to take these measures,” said Katharine Brayne, 74, of Cranford, and a Sidmouth in Bloom member.

“People shouldn’t be stealing plants from such a lovely area,” she added.

Julia Tucker, 54, from Nailsea, said: “It’s sad that people are taking flowers that are there for the enjoyment of the public, so I suppose it’s necessary to spend money on this kind of thing and make it stop.”

John and Margaret Dean, 80 and 84, from Leamington Spa, said: “If it works and stops the people from stealing the lovely flowers then it’s a good idea.

“Surely it would be quite complicated to get the microchip into a plant but if it doesn’t cost too much then it must be worth it.”

Brian Painter, 65, from Gittisham, said: “What a great idea, it is money well spent, especially for those who like to enjoy these gardens. I think lots of people will benefit from it.”

Dawn Pugsley, 40, from Sidmouth, backed the idea and said: “We pay council tax to have nice gardens. Microchips would stop people helping themselves.”

Dave Newall, 62, of Grove Mount, said: “I don’t think it’s a worthwhile use of money, they could think of a better idea that would prevent the theft.”

Geoffrey Parsons, 68, of Winslade Road, also had his doubts. He said: “It wouldn’t work because they wouldn’t put the money in.”

Martin Ratcliffe, 42, from Exmouth, said he didn’t think the move would work and suggested CCTV should be used instead.


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