Foam on Sidmouth’s seafront makes for a bit of a sight

PUBLISHED: 12:59 13 December 2018 | UPDATED: 09:18 14 December 2018

The sea foam on Sidmouth seafront. Picture: Paul Taylor.

The sea foam on Sidmouth seafront. Picture: Paul Taylor.

Archant

The sea foam at Sidmouth covered parts of the Esplanade making for quite a sight on Thursday morning (December 13).

These pictures and the video were taken by photographer Paul Taylor.

This strange algae phenomenon is caused when the sea becomes agitated. As the seawater is churned by breaking waves and surf next to the shore, the surfactants - which can act as foaming agents - trap air under turbulent conditions, forming persistent bubbles that stick to each other through surface tension.

Sea foam is a global phenomenon and it varies depending on location and the potential influence of the surrounding marine, freshwater, and/or terrestrial environments.

Due to its low density and persistence, foam can be blown by strong on-shore winds from the beach face inland.

The sea foam on Sidmouth seafront. Picture: Paul Taylor. The sea foam on Sidmouth seafront. Picture: Paul Taylor.

Sea foam is also known as spume, ocean foam or beach foam.


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