Sidmouth teen invited to Westminster launch around brain tumour research

PUBLISHED: 17:30 13 March 2018 | UPDATED: 09:52 15 March 2018

Charlotte and her parents Angie and Steve with Danny Clarke, televisions Instant Gardener at the Westminster event.

Charlotte and her parents Angie and Steve with Danny Clarke, televisions Instant Gardener at the Westminster event.

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A Sidmouth teenager has celebrated her 18th birthday in style after being invited to Westminster to find out about new plans to support brain tumour research.

Charlotte Reid with Caprice Bourret at a Westminster event launching an inquiry into brain tumour research.Charlotte Reid with Caprice Bourret at a Westminster event launching an inquiry into brain tumour research.

Charlotte Reid, who is living with a benign brain tumour, was among a star studded guest list at the launch of a government inquiry looking into the impacts of the disease.

The teen was diagnosed with a rare craniopharyngioma aged 15 which has left her with complications including poor eyesight and problems with her memory.

She was invited by John Bercow, speaker of the house, and travelled to the event with her parents Angela and Steve, a week after recovering from a seizure.

Charlotte, who is trying to raise £20,000 to fund a week of research at Plymouth University, said: “Being invited to the House of Commons is so exciting and something I never thought I would do. It’s the icing on the cake after my birthday celebrations and it’s really good to meet other people who have been affected by brain tumours.”

At the event last Tuesday, Charlotte was invited to submit evidence on a web forum facilitated by the charity Brain Tumour Research.

She was also presented with a bottle of champagne by the chief executive of Brain Tumour Research after celebrating her birthday last Sunday.

The inquiry will investigate the economic and social impacts of brain tumours and the government has announced it will plough £45 million into research.

Sue Farrington Smith, chief executive of Brain Tumour Research, said: “Brain tumours have been a neglected form of cancer for decades, killing more children and adults under the age of 40 than any other cancer.

“This inquiry will shine a light on the social and economic impacts of brain tumours adding weight to our arguments and landing a huge urgency to our call for further funding to improve patient outcomes and offer much-needed hope to people like Charlotte and her family.

“Whilst we welcome the funding announcement, the fact that the funds are spread over five years means that brain tumours remain a poor relation to other better-funded cancers.”

The charity is now preparing for its annual Wear A Hat Day on March 29.

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