Ugandan mums express heartfelt thanks to knitters

PUBLISHED: 16:55 26 March 2018 | UPDATED: 08:31 28 March 2018

Duncan and Rosalind Watt handed out donations included knitted garments from generous knitters in the Sid Valley and bars of soap to new mum's in Gulu Hospital and Maternity Unit.

Duncan and Rosalind Watt handed out donations included knitted garments from generous knitters in the Sid Valley and bars of soap to new mum's in Gulu Hospital and Maternity Unit.

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African families have sent their heartfelt thanks to generous knitters after their donations helped to clothe newborn babies and young children.

Duncan and Rosalind Watt handed out donations included knitted garments from generous knitters in the Sid Valley and bars of soap to new mum's in Gulu Hospital and Maternity Unit.Duncan and Rosalind Watt handed out donations included knitted garments from generous knitters in the Sid Valley and bars of soap to new mum's in Gulu Hospital and Maternity Unit.

Duncan and Rosalind Watt took bags of knitted garments made by Sid Valley residents to Uganda as part of their work with the East African Missionary Society.

The Salcombe Regis couple began travelling to Africa 18 years ago. On each trip they took out much-needed items, including clothing, to remote villages and Gulu’s maternity unit and ladies’ prison.

Duncan said: “The hospital have improved during the past year and the unit now has four functioning incubators - when there is power.

“Nevertheless, there is no running water to the wards and with only one delivery room coping with an average of 25 babies being born every day, it is a far cry from our NHS provision.

“Mums were thrilled to receive knitwear for their newborn babies, they have so little and rarely anything which is brand new. Several became very emotional when they realised that someone in the UK, 5,000 miles away, had taken the trouble to knit a beautiful jacket or hat for someone they didn’t know. They asked that we pass back their heartfelt thanks.”

The couple also used donations to buy soap as a bar costs half the average daily wage in the country and is considered a luxury.

Duncan said: “It is difficult for us in the UK to comprehend the joy these ladies experienced when they each received this gift, it was clearly of great value.”

During their stay, Rosalind visited the ladies’ prison and handed out donated knitwear as women with youngsters under three years old are allowed to keep their children with them.

Duncan added: “These mothers and their children rarely have visitors let alone gifts, so were delighted with their useful gifts.”

The couple will return to Uganda in the autumn.

Visit www.teamsonline.org if you would like to read more of what The East African Missionary Society does.

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